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Using image data

Galleria uses a data model that contains all image data that will be used for the Gallery. There are several ways of defining this data and this document attempts to explain how the data can be passed into Galleria using different techniques.

The data structure is best defined using a JSON array, since JavaScript plays well with JSON and Galleria uses it internally. But the beginner will most likely start with plain HTML that Galleria reads and converts to a data structure.

Please note that 1.2.5 introduced a new entity called “layer”. This can contain any HTML that will follow the image, also during transitions.

Read more about the layer and view examples here: http://galleriajs.tumblr.com/post/8091630096/introducing-in-1-2-5-html-layer

Definition

The image data object that Galleria uses is defined like this:

  • thumb – the thumbnail image (optional)
  • image – the main image (required)
  • big – the big image for fullscreen mode (optional)
  • title – the image title (optional)
  • description – the image description (optional)
  • link – the image link url (optional)
  • layer – A layer of HTML that will be displayed on top of the content (optional)
  • video – An URL to a video, as per 1.2.7 we support Vimeo and Youtube URLs.
  • iframe – An URL to be displayed in an iframe.
  • original a reference to the original IMG element (optional)

You can provide this data to Galleria in a number of ways. The easiest way to start is probably by using plain HTML, but you’ll get more control using JSON.

1. Using HTML

The most common way for a quick start is to let Galleria parse the HTML and extract data itself.

By default, Galleria parses your HTML in a specific way. The minimum HTML required for Galleria to function is this:

<img src="image.jpg">

You can place the <img> tags anywhere inside the container from where you call galleria. This will give Galleria the following stripped data structure:

{
    thumb: 'image.jpg',
    image: 'image.jpg',
    big: 'image.jpg',
    original: [IMG element]
}

Note that Galleria will use the image.jpg file to create thumbnails and the big image if you do not provide separate files for these views.

Captions & meta data

If you want to extract meta data from the HTML source such as title & description, you can provide this as <img> attributes:

<img src="image.jpg" data-title="My title" data-description="My <strong>description</strong>" data-link="http://my.destination.com">

Now you’ll get the following data:

{
    thumb: 'image.jpg',
    image: 'image.jpg',
    big: 'image.jpg',
    title: 'My title',
    description: 'My <strong>description</strong>',
    link: 'http://my.destination.com',
    original: [IMG element]
}

Separate thumbnails

If you want to provide separate thumbnails (highly recommended), just link the main image using <a> tags:

<a href="image.jpg"><img src="thumb.jpg"></a>

Now you’ll get the following data:

{
    thumb: 'thumb.jpg',
    image: 'image.jpg',
    big: 'image.jpg',
    original: [IMG element]
}

Separate fullscreen image

You can also specify a separate larger image for fullscreen & lightbox using the data-big attribute on the IMG tag:

<a href="image.jpg"><img data-big="big.jpg" src="thumb.jpg"></a>

This will give you:

{
    thumb: 'thumb.jpg',
    image: 'image.jpg',
    big: 'big.jpg',
    original: [IMG element]
}

Adding video in the slideshow

Since version 1.2.7 Galleria supports Youtube, Vimeo and Dailymotion embeds. The way it works is that you pass a full URL to the movie and then Galleria will parse and create the video frame for you.

You can provide your custom thumbnail, or Galleria will fetch a thumbnail from the provider.

How to add a youtube movie with a custom thumbnail:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCZrz8siv4Q"><img src="thumb.jpg"></a>

Galleria will parse the video URL and other options set and create the iframe URL for you:

{
    thumb: 'thumb.jpg',
    iframe: 'http://www.youtube.com/embed/GCZrz8siv4Q?wmode=opaque'
}

You can also add display options using the vimeo, youtube and dailymotion options.

If you want Galleria to fetch thumbnails from the provider API’s, just provide an element with a ‘video’ class instead of a thumbnail:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCZrz8siv4Q"><span class="video">Watch this at YouTube</span></a>

Since 1.3, Galleria supports poster images for videos. It will automatically fetch posters from its provider, but you may also manually add one using the data-image attribute:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCZrz8siv4Q"><span class="video" data-image="/myposter.jpg">Watch this at YouTube</span></a>

Displaying iframes

Since version 1.2.7, Galleria also supports iframes to be displayed instead of an image. Here’s how to add an iframe:

<a href="http://aino.com"><img class="iframe" src="thumb.jpg"></a>

This will give you:

{
    thumb: 'thumb.jpg',
    iframe: 'http://aino.com'
}

You can also skip the thumbnail by adding an element with the class ‘iframe’:

<a href="http://aino.com"><span class="iframe">Check out aino.com</span></a>

The thumbnail container will then get the class ‘frame’, so you can style it as you wish.

Adding a layer above the content

Galleria also supports a layer of HTML content that can will be placed above the image or video. The layer will follow the transitions (unless you disable it using the layerFollow option) and expand on fullscreen.

A layer can be defined using the data-layer attribute:

<img data-big="big.jpg" data-layer="<h2>A title</h2><p>Some content</p>">

You can also define a layer using JSON or dataConfig, read further for more information about these extraction methods.

2. Using HTML with dataConfig

You can also use the dataConfig option combined with HTML to obtain richer data from other sources to provide HTML captions or other custom data types.

This is also useful if you want to add a richer markup for better accessibility.

An example on how to use the dataConfig option to extract HTML captions from <p> tags:

<div class="galleria">
    <li>
        <img src="myimage.jpg">
        <p>My caption is <strong>gr8</strong></p>
    </li>
    <li>
        <img src="myimage2.jpg">
        <p>My other caption is also <em>gr8</em></p>
    </li>
</div>
<script>
Galleria.run('.galleria', {
    dataConfig: function(img) {
        return {
            description: $(img).next('p').html()
        }
    }
});

The dataConfig option function should return an object with any data key/value you wish to provide. If the key existed elsewhere, this will override it. In the example above, we extracted the HTML from the next paragraph after the image element and told Galleria that this is the description data.

3. Using JSON

Another handy way to serve data is to provide a JSON array to Galleria. This method is preferred by many developers, since you gain more control over what is served to the client, and when. By serving HTML to the client and then let Galleria parse that HTML into Galleria data might be a performance downer if you don’t provide separate thumbnails, since the client has to download all images at once.

Providing JSON data to Galleria is really easy:

<div class="galleria"></div>
<script>
var data = [
    {
        thumb: 'thumb.jpg',
        image: 'image.jpg',
        big: 'big.jpg',
        title: 'My title',
        description: 'My description',
        link: 'http://my.destination.com',
        layer: '<div><h2>This image is gr8</h2><p>And this text will be on top of the image</p>'
    },
    {
        video: 'http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCZrz8siv4Q',
        title: 'My second title',
        description: 'My second description'
    },
    {
        thumb: 'thumb.jpg',
        iframe: 'http://aino.com',
        title: 'My third title'
    }
];
Galleria.run('.galleria', {
    dataSource: data
});

Using JSON also makes sense if you want to modify the data using push() and splice(). Remember that you can also use load() to load an entire different data set into a Galleria instance at runtime. This makes it easy to create links to separate galleries, f.ex photography categories.